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St. Mesmin

ST. MESMIN was a native of Verdun. The inhabitants of that place having proved disloyal to King Clovis, an uncle of our Saint’s, a priest named Euspice, brought about a reconciliation between the monarch and his subjects. Clovis, appreciating the virtues of Euspice, persuaded him to take up his residence at court, and the servant of God took St. Mesmin along with him.

While journeying to Orleans with Clovis he noticed at about two leagues from the city, beyond the Loire, a solitary spot called Micy, which he thought well suited for a retreat. Having asked for and obtained the place, Euspice with Mesmin and several disciples built there a monastery, of which he took charge. At his death, which happened about two years afterwards, Euspice was appointed abbot by Eusebius, Bishop of Orleans.

During a terrible famine he fed nearly the whole city of Orleans with wheat from his monastery, without perceptibly reducing it; he also drove an enormous serpent out of the place in which he was afterwards buried. Having governed his monastery ten years, he died as he had lived, in the odor of sanctity, on the 15th of December, 520.

Reflection.—Few are called to serve God by great actions, but all are bound to strive after perfection in the ordinary actions of their daily life.


The Saint of the Day courtesy of Butler's Lives of the Saints, 1894 Edition.
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